References

Holograms for Acoustics

"Holograms for Acoustics"

 

Nature (2016) doi:10.1038/nature19755

Kai Melde, Dr. Andrew G. Mark, Dr. Tian Qiu, Prof. Peer Fischer

Micro Nano and Molecular Systems Lab

Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart

Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays1, high density data storage and tweezing that require spatial control of intricate optical2 or acoustic fields3,4 within a 3D volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront5,6 in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source...

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References

Structured light enables biomimetic swimming and versatile locomotion of photo-responsive soft microrobots

“Structured light enables biomimetic swimming and versatile locomotion of photo-responsive soft microrobots”

 

S. Palagi, A. G. Mark, S. Y. Reigh, K. Melde, T. Qiu, H. Zeng, C. Parmeggiani, D. Martella, A. S. Castillo, N. Kapernaum, F. Giesselmann, D. S. Wiersma, E. Lauga, and P. Fischer.

Nature Materials (2016).

Microorganisms move in challenging environments by periodic changes in body shape. In contrast, current artificial microrobots cannot actively deform, exhibiting at best passive bending under external fields. Here, by taking advantage of the wireless, scalable and spatiotemporally selective capabilities that light allows, we show that soft microrobots consisting of photoactive liquid-crystal elastomers can be driven by structured monochromatic light to perform sophisticated biomimetic motions...

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References

Reciprocal Micro-swimmers in Biological Fluids

Winner of the Micro-robotic Design Challenge in Hamlyn Symposium on Medical

Robotics, 23 June 2015, London, UK

 

Authors: T. Qiu, A. Mark, D. Walker, A. Posada, and P. Fischer, Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Germany.

"Swimming by Reciprocal Motion at Low Reynolds Number"

 

Tian Qiu, Tung-Chun Lee, Andrew G. Mark, Konstantin I. Morozov, Raphael Münster, Otto Mierka, Stefan Turek, Alexander M. Leshansky, and Peer Fischer.

Nat. Commun. 5: 5119 (2014).

References

Helical Micro and Nanopropellers for Applications in Biological

Fluidic Environments

Micro-robotic Design Challenge in Hamlyn Symposium on Medical Robotics, 23 June 2015, London, UK

 

Authors: D. Walker, T. Qiu, A. Mark, , A. Posada, and P. Fischer, Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Germany.

“Nano-Propellers and their Actuation in Complex Viscoelastic Media”

 

D. Schamel, A.G. Mark, J.G. Gibb, C. Miksch, K.I. Morozov, A.M. Leshansky, P. Fischer. ACS Nano 8, 8794–8801, (2014).

References

A Swimming Micro-Scallop

Process illustrated in this video:

 

1.) Tian Qiu, Tung-Chun Lee, Andrew G. Mark, Konstantin I. Morozov, Raphael Münster, Otto Mierka, Stefan Turek, Alexander M. Leshansky, and Peer Fischer. "Swimming by Reciprocal Motion at Low Reynolds Number". Nat. Commun. 5: 5119 doi: 10.1038/ncomms6119 (2014).

 

Experimental work was conducted:

 

Prof. Peer Fischer

Tian Qiu, Dr. Tung-Chun Lee, Dr. Andrew Mark

Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems

Stuttgart, Germany.

 

In collaboration with:

 

Prof. A. M. Leshansky & Dr. K. I. Morozov

Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology,

Haifa, Israel.

 

Prof. S. Turek, R. Münster & Dr. O. Mierka

Institute of Applied Mathematics (LS III), TU Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany.

References

Fabrication of designer nanostructures.

Growth process illustrated in this video:

 

1.) A.G. Mark, J.G. Gibbs, T.-C. Lee, P. Fischer,

“ Hybrid nanocolloids with programmed 3D-shape and material composition”, Nature Materials 12, 802-807 (2013).

 

2.) J.G. Gibbs, A.G. Mark, T.-C. Lee, S. Eslami, D. Schamel, P. Fischer,

„Nanohelices by shadow growth“,  Nanoscale  DOI: 10.1039/C4NR00403E  (2014).

 

Micelle Nanolithography:

 

3.) R. Glass, M. Möller, J.P. Spatz,

„Block copolymer micelle nanolithography“, Nanotechnology 14, 1153-1160 (2003).

 

 

References

Nanopropropellers.

 

1.) A. Ghosh and P. Fischer,

“Magnetically actuated propulsion at low Reynolds numbers: towards nanoscale control”,

Nanoscale 3, 557-563 (2010).

 

2.) P. Fischer and A. Ghosh,

“Controlled Propulsion of Artificial Magnetic Nanostructured Propellers",

Nano Letters 9, 2243-2245 (2009).

 

3.) D. Schamel, M. Pfeifer, J.G. Gibbs, B. Miksch, A.G. Mark, P. Fischer,

“Chiral colloidal molecules and observation of the propeller effect”,

J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 12353 (2013).

 

Micro-bots.

 

Using nano-structured surfaces scientists make micro-robots that can be propelled through liquids with unprecedented control and precision. Each micro-robot is essentially a glass-screw with a screw-pitch that that is less than the wavelength of visible light. The body is made from glass and a magnetic material (cobalt) is added to magnetize and drive these “artificial swimmers” with a magnetic field. Video: Harvard University.

 

Read more at: (PhysOrg.com)

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